EMail made UN-Simple

Imagine you want to communicate with someone at a remote location.

It used to be that you took a piece of paper, wrote your message on it, put it in an envelope, wrote the address on the envelope and dropped it in any handy mailbox.

Have you seen what this has become?

Open System Manager for MS Exchange and you are presented with the following options under the “Recipients” tab: (which is just a very small sample of all the available options):

  • Details Templates
  • Address Templates
  • All Address Lists
  • All Global Address Lists
  • Offline Address Lists
  • Recipient Update Services
  • Recipient Policies

    Everything except, well, a list of recipients.

    How about these Email Address Policy Generation Rules?

  • smtp=%g.%s@somedomain.com
  • smtp=@somedomain.com
  • smtp=msgr.%g.%s@somedomain.com
  • X400=c=us;a=;p=DOT;o=exchange

    There are “Server Administrative Groups” where you can set up “Connectors” and “First Storage Groups” and “Queues” and “Protocols”.

    As an email administator, I guess I just got used to working with it and never really thought to ask (before now) “What does ANY of this really have to do with just sending someone what amounts to a simple text file, with perhaps a file along with it?”

    The vast majority of email users could not care less about the vast majority of available features in Exchange.

    I’m talking specifically about Microsoft Exchange, here, but it applies to a lot of eMail servers. And not only to email, but other common simple tasks.

    Take Tape Backup for example.

    Basically, for tape back up, I want to say: “Take all this stuff and put it on that tape?” How hard is that? Pretty darn hard if you consulted with the makers of BackupExec.

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    About combatdba

    I'm a production DBA at a terabyte-class SQL Server Shop
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